A comparison of chinese and russian communism

Roman emperor; reconquered Mediterranean empire; accelerated Catholic-Monophysite schism Hinduism; Jainism founder of Jainism Source of list of names:

A comparison of chinese and russian communism

The Black Book of Communism - Wikipedia

Red Plenty, a semi-fictionalized account of the history of socialist economic planning, seemed like a natural follow-up. Marx had drawn a nightmare picture of what happened to human life under capitalism, when everything was produced only in order to be exchanged; when true qualities and uses dropped away, and the human power of making and doing itself became only an object to be traded.

Then the makers and the things made turned alike into commodities, and the motion of society turned into a kind of zombie dance, a grim cavorting whirl in which objects and people blurred together till the objects were half alive and the people were half dead.

Stock-market prices acted back upon the world as if they were independent powers, requiring factories to be opened or closed, real human beings to work or rest, hurry or dawdle; and they, having given the transfusion that made the stock prices come alive, felt their flesh go cold and impersonal on them, mere mechanisms for chunking out the man-hours.

Living money and dying humans, metal as tender as skin and skin as hard as metal, taking hands, and dancing round, and round, and round, with no way ever of stopping; the quickened and the deadened, whirling on. And what would be the alternative?

The consciously arranged alternative? A dance of another nature. A dance to the music of use, where every step fulfilled some real need, did some tangible good, and no matter how fast the dancers spun, they moved easily, because they moved to a human measure, intelligible to all, chosen by all.

Needless to say, this is Relevant To My Interests, which include among them poetic allegories for coordination problems. And I was not disappointed. Strange as it may seem, the gray, oppressive USSR was founded on a fairy tale. And just for a little while, in the heady years of the late s, the magic seemed to be working.

Red Plenty is about that moment in history, and how it came, and how it went away; about the brief era when, under the rash leadership of Khrushchev, the Soviet Union looked forward to a future of rich communists and envious capitalists, when Moscow would out-glitter Manhattan and every Lada would be better engineered than a Porsche.

And this was the first interesting thing I learned. Capitalism is good at growing the economy and making countries rich.

Communism is good at caring for the poor and promoting equality. So your choice between capitalism and communism is a trade-off between those two things.

But for at least the first fifty years of the Cold War, the Soviets would not have come close to granting you that these are the premises on which the battle must be fought.

They were officially quite certain that any day now Communism was going to prove itself better at economic growth, better at making people rich quickly, than capitalism.

Even unofficially, most of their leaders and economists were pretty certain of it. And for a little while, even their capitalist enemies secretly worried they were right. The arguments are easy to understand.I. I decided to read Red Plenty because my biggest gripe after reading Singer’s book on Marx was that Marx refused to plan how communism would actually work, instead preferring to leave the entire matter for the World-Spirit to sort out.

A comparison of chinese and russian communism

But almost everything that interests me about Communism falls under the category of “how communism . Mahapadma Nanda became King of Magadha and created what looks like the first "Empire" in Northern India.

While Indian history begins with some confidence with the Mauyras, the Nandas are now emerging into the light of history with a .

The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression is a book by Stéphane Courtois, Nicolas Werth, Andrzej Paczkowski and several other European academics documenting a history of political repressions by Communist states, including genocides, extrajudicial executions, deportations, killing population in labor camps and artificially created famines. I. I decided to read Red Plenty because my biggest gripe after reading Singer’s book on Marx was that Marx refused to plan how communism would actually work, instead preferring to leave the entire matter for the World-Spirit to sort out. But almost everything that interests me about Communism falls under the category of “how communism . Man is not the best of things in the universe. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, Book VI, Chapter vii; (H. Rackham, Loeb Classical Library, , , p. ) []Ayn Rand () Ayn Rand (born Alice Rosenbaum) is a fascinating person and an inspiring advocate of freedom but a very mixed blessing philosophically.

The Wuhan Gang & The Chungking Gang, i.e., the offsprings of the American missionaries, diplomats, military officers, 'revolutionaries' & Red Saboteurs and the "Old China Hands" of the s and the herald-runners of the Dixie Mission of the s. Anti-communism is opposition to leslutinsduphoenix.comzed anti-communism developed after the October Revolution in the U.S.S.R.

and it reached global dimensions during the Cold War, when the United States and the Soviet Union engaged in an intense rivalry. Anti-communism has been an element of movements holding many different political positions, including nationalist, social .

Hell & Israel: Après Lavrov le deluge

Welcome to Russia. The Russian character has been formed over centuries and traditions persist despite 70 years of communism.

America and Russia Similarities. [This analysis was written for the Unz Review] For those interested in the military implications of the recent revelations by Vladimir Putin about new Russian weapon systems I would recommend the excellent article entitled “The Implications of Russia’s New Weapon Systems” by Andrei Martyanov who offers a superb analysis of what .

A comparison of chinese and russian communism
Book Review: Red Plenty | Slate Star Codex